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SQLSaturday #320 – Raleigh 2014

SQL Server Team - blog - August 2014

UpSearch at SQLSaturday #320

UpSearch proudly sponsored PASS SQLSaturday #320 – Raleigh 2014. The event was held September 6, 2014 at the Wake Tech Northern Campus, 6600 Louisburg Road, Raleigh, NC 27616. UpSearch’s sponsor raffle giveaway was a FREE SQL Server Health Check, a $2,000 value.

Sponsor Raffle Winner

Congratulations Geetha Namballa and Fujitsu America, Inc.

Geetha Namballa won UpSearch’s sponsor raffle. Her organization receives a FREE SQL Server Health Check.

Presentations

The UpSearch team (pictured left to right: Allen White and Brian Davis) also supported SQLSaturday #320 – Raleigh 2014 by making four presentations:

SQL Server Team Allen White and Brian Davis

Allen White presented on how to use PowerShell to efficiently manage SQL Server.

Allen White presented on how to use Server Broker.

Brian Davis presented on how to use SSIS Templates.

Brian Davis presented on how to automate SQL Server installs.

Goodbye Next, Next, Next...Hello Automated Installs!

Special Mentions

We appreciate the Triangle SQL Server User Group’s (triPASS) team effort to host SQLSaturday #320– Raleigh 2014. If you live near Raleigh, N.C. consider getting involved in triPASS and find them on Twitter at .

And to all of our SQL Server BFFs, like Paul Turley and Randy Knight, thank you for making SQLSaturdays so much fun!

 

About PASS SQLSaturday

up-social-round

The PASS SQLSaturday program provides the tools and knowledge needed for groups and event leaders to organize and host a free day of training for SQL Server professionals. 

At the local event level, SQLSaturday events:

  • Encourage increased membership for the local user group
  • Provide local SQL Server professionals with excellent training and networking opportunities
  • Help develop, grow, and encourage new speakers

To learn more about PASS SQL Saturday visit http://www.sqlsaturday.com/about.aspx.

About UpSearch

up-social-round UpSearch provides as needed Microsoft SQL Server DBA Services across the globe. We specialize in helping leaders protect, unlock and optimize data’s value.

To learn more about UpSearch visit https://upsearch.com.

 

SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part Two

Service Broker is not a black box. SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part Two was designed to support your messaging needs and make sense of Service Broker.

Continued from SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part One

SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part Two

Originally published on SQLBlog.com.SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part Two

In the previous post, I introduced SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part One.  In this post, I’d like to cover some of the “plumbing” – the components that allow communication between different servers running Service Broker.

Endpoints. There needs to be a channel for the communications coming in and out of the server, and in the IP world that channel exists in the form of a port. You define the port to be used by defining an Endpoint in the master database.

CREATE ENDPOINT IntEndpoint
STATE = STARTED
AS TCP ( LISTENER_PORT = 4022 )
FOR SERVICE_BROKER (AUTHENTICATION = WINDOWS );
GO

Routes. To get from one place to another Service Broker routes need to be defined. You’ll need a route to the remote server defined in the database where your Service Broker application is running, and also one to the local server, and the latter needs to be defined in the msdb database. Defining a remote destination in your application database places the route information in sys.routes, but Service Broker always looks in msdb.sys.routes for any incoming messages to determine where they go.

USE AdventureWorks
GO

CREATE ROUTE DMZRoute 
AUTHORIZATION dbo 
WITH 
     SERVICE_NAME = N'//DMZSite/Sync/IntService',
     ADDRESS = N'TCP://SQLTBWS:4023'
GO

USE msdb;
GO

CREATE ROUTE IntRoute 
AUTHORIZATION dbo 
WITH 
     SERVICE_NAME = N'//IntSite/Sync/IntService',
     ADDRESS = N'LOCAL'
GO

One thing I hadn’t addressed in my last post was message security. Service Broker allows you to encrypt all messages, preventing network sniffers from discovering the data being sent. To enable this I created certificates at each site, and created a database user without a login to send and receive messages. Here’s the code I used to create the local user:

USE AdventureWorks
GO

CREATE MASTER KEY
       ENCRYPTION BY PASSWORD = N'<enter REALLY secure password string here>';
GO

CREATE USER IntUser WITHOUT LOGIN;
GO
CREATE CERTIFICATE IntCert 
     AUTHORIZATION IntUser
     WITH SUBJECT = 'Int Certificate',
          EXPIRY_DATE = N'12/31/2012';

BACKUP CERTIFICATE IntCert
  TO FILE = N'E:\Certs\IntCert.cer';
GO

I did the same thing at the destination site (called DMZSite), and to allow the DMZUser to send messages to my site I’ll create a local user from the certificate created at that site.

CREATE USER DMZUser WITHOUT LOGIN;

CREATE CERTIFICATE DMZCert
   AUTHORIZATION DMZUser
   FROM FILE = N'E:\Certs\DMZCert.cer';
GO

Remote Service Binding. Once the users are established and secure, the last component required is the Remote Service Binding. This binds a remote Service Broker service to our local one, defining the security credentials to be used in the conversations.

CREATE REMOTE SERVICE BINDING [DMZBinding] 
  AUTHORIZATION dbo 
  TO SERVICE N'//DMZSite/Sync/IntService'
  WITH USER = [DMZUser]
GO

Finally, we’ll grant the SEND permission to the DMZUser to allow the remote service to send messages to our site.

GRANT SEND
      ON SERVICE::[//IntSite/Sync/IntService]
      TO DMZUser;
GO

As I mentioned before, this set of objects make up the “plumbing” that allow separate instances or servers to communicate with each other. In my next post we’ll talk about the automated activation process and walk through the steps of message handling.

Reprinted with author’s permission from SQLBlog.com.

>> Back to SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part One <<

 

UpSearch

About the Author

Microsoft SQL Server MVP and Practice Leader

Allen White

Allen White is an UpSearch Alum and Microsoft SQL Server MVP.  For over 30 years, Allen has specialized in developing applications that manage the movement of data and maximize data's usefulness. Allen excels at communicating highly technical information using language that results in increased client engagement and understanding, regardless of technical competency.

Allen has been working with relational database systems for over 20 years. He has architected database solutions in application areas like retail point-of-sale (POS), POS audit, loss prevention, logistics, school district information management, purchasing and asset inventory and runtime analytics. Allen thrives on providing comprehensive solutions to information management problems across a great variety of application environments.

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part One

Service Broker is not a black box. SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part One was designed to support your messaging needs and make sense of Service Broker.

SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part One

Originally published on SQLBlog.com.SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part One

I’m currently implementing a SQL Server Service Broker solution at a client site, and it’s been an interesting challenge, because there’s not a lot of information out there to help guide you through the process. Here I’d like to walk you through the basics.

Message Types. Service Broker sends messages asynchronously from one database to another. You can set it up to send messages between databases on a single server, or between SQL Server instances on a Windows server, or between different physical servers, whether or not they’re in the same domain. Essentially Service Broker works at the database level, the rest is handled through routing, which I’ll address in another post.

The important thing to remember is that Service Broker sends and receives messages, and then your applications (or stored procedures) handle those messages in some way. It handles them asynchronously, so the sending side doesn’t have to wait for the receiving side to acknowledge the message, and it handles them sequentially, so the messages will always arrive in the order in which they’ve been sent.

Many of the examples you’ll see use message types like “REQUESTMESSAGE” and “REPLYMESSAGE”. To me this is a disservice, because it doesn’t help you see the different ways you can use Service Broker to solve your business problems. At my client site the message types indicate the content of the message, so the receiving side can use the type to determine the action to take when the message is received. Service Broker has a built-in acknowledgement process, so you don’t need to specifically acknowledge a message, unless the application needs it. As long as the communication channels are open, the message will be delivered.

CREATE MESSAGE TYPE [//AWSync/Sync/HumanResourcesEmployee]
AUTHORIZATION dbo
VALIDATION = WELL_FORMED_XML
GO

Contracts. Once you’ve defined the types of messages that can be sent, you need to define how they’ll be delivered. Contracts define what message types are allowed to be sent, and in which direction. This means that Service Broker is secure in that it won’t process any messages types not defined in a contract, so rogue processes that attempt to try a type of SQL Injection attack against Service Broker will fail.

CREATE CONTRACT [//AWSync/Sync/IntContract]
	AUTHORIZATION dbo
	( [//AWSync/Sync/HumanResourcesEmployee] SENT BY ANY,
	  [//AWSync/Sync/PersonContact] SENT BY ANY,
      [//AWSync/Sync/PurchasingVendor] SENT BY ANY )
GO

Queues. Once the contract is defined, you can define the queue on which the messages are sent and received. The queue also defines (if you want) an automated process that will handle the messages it receives. In your Transact-SQL code you retrieve messages from the queue in the same way you read data from a table – in fact, the queue behaves just like a table in your database.

CREATE QUEUE IntQueue
   WITH
   STATUS = ON,
   RETENTION = OFF
GO

Services. The service is the glue which assigns the contract to the queue. It performs the work of actually sending the messages on the queue to their destination and receiving the messages coming from other senders.

CREATE SERVICE [//IntSite/Sync/IntService]
AUTHORIZATION IntUser
ON QUEUE IntQueue
([//AWSync/Sync/IntContract])
GO

Conversations. In its simplest form, the last thing we need is to send the message. We do that via a conversation, which is referred to in Service Broker as a DIALOG CONVERSATION or simply a DIALOG. You specify the source and destination service name, and a conversation handle (a GUID) is returned, then you SEND ON CONVERSATION using that conversation handle. The message body is usually in an XML form, and for security purposes should be encrypted.

BEGIN DIALOG @InitDlgHandle
   FROM SERVICE [//IntSite/Sync/IntService]
   TO SERVICE N'//ExtSite/Sync/IntService'
   ON CONTRACT [//AWSync/Sync/IntContract]
   WITH
	   ENCRYPTION = ON;

SEND ON CONVERSATION @InitDlgHandle
   MESSAGE TYPE [//AWSync/Sync/HumanResourcesEmployee]
   (@ChangeMsg);

Finally, you need to be able to receive the messages. Like I mentioned earlier, reading from a queue is like reading from a table, but there are some additional features in Transact-SQL to facilitate message handling. Specifically, there’s a special form of the WAITFOR command which will wait for either the arrival of a message, or timeout after a specified number of milliseconds.

WAITFOR (
	RECEIVE TOP(1)
		@ch = conversation_handle,
		@service_name = service_name,
		@service_contract_name = service_contract_name,
		@messagetypename = message_type_name,
		@messagebody = CAST(message_body AS XML)
	FROM ExtQueue
), TIMEOUT 60000

With these components you can set up messaging within a single instance of SQL Server. In my next post I’ll discuss the additional plumbing required to communicate between separate instances.

Reprinted with author’s permission from SQLBlog.com.

>> Continue Reading SQL Server Service Broker Basics Part Two <<

 

UpSearch

About the Author

Microsoft SQL Server MVP and Practice Leader

Allen White

Allen White is an UpSearch Alum and Microsoft SQL Server MVP.  For over 30 years, Allen has specialized in developing applications that manage the movement of data and maximize data's usefulness. Allen excels at communicating highly technical information using language that results in increased client engagement and understanding, regardless of technical competency.

Allen has been working with relational database systems for over 20 years. He has architected database solutions in application areas like retail point-of-sale (POS), POS audit, loss prevention, logistics, school district information management, purchasing and asset inventory and runtime analytics. Allen thrives on providing comprehensive solutions to information management problems across a great variety of application environments.

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

Get Near Real Time ETL with SQL Server Service Broker

 

About the Presentation

ETL with SQL Server Service BrokerMost of the time you’ll see SQL Server ETL being done with a tool such as SSIS, but what if you need near-realtime reporting? This session will demonstrate how to keep your data warehouse updated using Service Broker messages from your OLTP database.

Session Level: Intermediate

Download the Presentation

Get Near Real Time ETL with SQL Server Service Broker

Presentations (Upcoming & Past)

Want to Learn More About SQL Server Service Broker?

If you'd like to learn more about how UpSearch can support your SQL Server service broker initiative, visit SQL Server Service Broker or contact us today.

About the Author

Microsoft SQL Server MVP and Practice Leader

Allen White

Allen White is an UpSearch Alum and Microsoft SQL Server MVP.  For over 30 years, Allen has specialized in developing applications that manage the movement of data and maximize data's usefulness. Allen excels at communicating highly technical information using language that results in increased client engagement and understanding, regardless of technical competency.

Allen has been working with relational database systems for over 20 years. He has architected database solutions in application areas like retail point-of-sale (POS), POS audit, loss prevention, logistics, school district information management, purchasing and asset inventory and runtime analytics. Allen thrives on providing comprehensive solutions to information management problems across a great variety of application environments.

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

SQLSaturday #299 – Columbus 2014

SQL Server Team - blog - August 2014

UpSearch at SQLSaturday #299

UpSearch proudly sponsored PASS SQLSaturday #299 – Columbus 2014.  The event was held Jun 14, 2014 at the Bishop James A. Griffin Student Center (Bldg 17) on the beautiful Ohio Dominican University campus located at 1215 Sunbury Road, Columbus, OH 43219. UpSearch’s Allen White and Brian Davis volunteered to make four presentations.

Sponsor Raffle Winner

Congratulations Scott Thomas and Fiserv!

Scott Thomas won UpSearch’s sponsor raffle. His organization, Fiserv, receives a FREE SQL Server Health Check.

Presentations

The UpSearch team (pictured left to right: Brian Davis and Allen White) also supported SQLSaturday #299 – Columbus 2014 by volunteering to make four presentations:

SQLSaturday #299 Columbus - June 14 2014

Brian Davis presented Getting Started with Hekaton and how Hekaton can help you.

gettingstartedwithhekaton

Brian Davis made a presentation on how to use SSIS Templates.

by Brian Davis

Allen White presented how to keep your data warehouse updated using SQL Server Service Broker messages from your OLTP database.

Allen White made a presentation on how to use PowerShell to efficiently manage SQL Server.

Special Mentions

We appreciate the Columbus SQL Server User Group’s team effort to host SQLSaturday #299 – Columbus 2014. If you live in the Greater Columbus, Ohio area, consider getting involved with Columbus PASS (CBusPASS).

And finally, a special thank you to Chris Bell of WaterOx Consulting for making a SQLSaturday #299 – Columbus 2014 quick review.

About PASS SQLSaturday

up-social-round

The PASS SQLSaturday program provides the tools and knowledge needed for groups and event leaders to organize and host a free day of training for SQL Server professionals. 

To learn more about PASS SQL Saturday visit http://www.sqlsaturday.com/about.aspx.

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch provides as needed Microsoft SQL Server DBA Services across the globe. We specialize in helping leaders protect, unlock and optimize data’s value.

To learn more about UpSearch visit https://upsearch.com.