Auditing doesn’t have to be scary.  SQL Server Audit 102 – Reading Audit Output is part of a blog series designed to help you audit database changes with SQL Server Audit.  Contact us if you have any questions about how to select and implement the right auditing solution for your organization.  

SQL Server Audit 102 – Reading Audit Output

SQL Server Audit 102 – Reading Audit OutputOriginally published on ColleenMorrow.com.

In SQL Server Audit 101 – Creating Basic Audit, we went over the basics of creating a SQL Audit. Now obviously once you’ve gotten your audit in place, you’re going to want to look at the output once in a while, right? Right. So that’s what we’re going to go over today.

If you’re using the default file output for your audit, you have two options for reading your audit output: the log viewer and the fn_get_audit_file function.

Log Viewer

We briefly touched on using the log viewer last time, but in case you missed that post, you can view the audit logs by right-clicking on the Audit object and selecting View Audit Logs. The nice thing about the log viewer is that it’s convenient for taking a quick look at your most recent audit records, without having to know the exact path and file name of your current audit file. On the downside, you’re limited to the most recent 1000 records, so if you’ve got a busy system generating a lot of audit records, you might miss something. And you really can’t run reports or archive records using the Log Viewer, now can you? So, if you’re going to use audit files and do some serious auditing, you’ll want a more powerful tool.

fn_get_audit_file

Fortunately, we have that tool in the fn_get_audit_file function. The great thing about this function is that it allows us to treat the audit output file like a table; so we can search, filter and order our audit records like any other data. We can insert it into a table for archival and reporting purposes, and we can join it with other audit files to find trends in our audit data. And, unlike the Log Viewer, we’re not limited in the number of records we can view.

Using fn_get_audit_file

The fn_get_audit_file function accepts 3 parameters:

  • file_pattern – The first parameter is the file pattern, which specifies the path and file name of the audit file(s) to be read. You have to specify a path and a file name, though the file name can be or include a wildcard. So, for example, acceptable values would be ‘d:\myAudits\MyAudit*.sqlaudit’ or ‘\\Myserver\d$\myAudits\*’. You can also specify a specific file name, if that’s the only one you want to read.
  • initial_file_name – The second parameter is the initial file name. Suppose there were multiple files in d:\myAudits that started with MyAudit*, but I didn’t want to process them all. I could use this parameter to tell SQL Server which file to start with, and it will read that file and the remaining files after it.
  • audit_record_offset – This last parameter is used in conjunction with the initial file name to tell SQL Server where in that initial file to start. This comes in handy when you’ve already processed some records in that initial file, and you just want to pick up where you left off.

Examples

Let’s look at some examples using the DDLAudit audit I created last week. We’ll start with a basic query, reading in all the records in all the files we’ve accumulated so far.

select * from fn_get_audit_file ('D:\SQL2012\Audits\DDLAudit*.sqlaudit', DEFAULT, DEFAULT)

In my case, I only get four records returned, but that’s ok for this demo. If I scroll over to the file_name and audit_file_offset columns, I can make a note of my last audit record so far.

Get-audit-offset

I’ll create and drop a table in AdventureWorks2012 to generate a couple of audit records.

Use AdventureWorks2012
GO
CREATE TABLE myAuditTest2 (col1 int);
GO
DROP TABLE myAuditTest2;
GO

Now, if I run that same basic query again, I’ll get the new audit records in addition to the old records I’ve already viewed. But, if I use the initial_file_name and audit_file_offset parameter to tell SQL Server where I left off last time, I’ll only get the new records.

select * from fn_get_audit_file
   ('D:\SQL2012\Audits\DDLAudit*.sqlaudit',
    'D:\SQL2012\Audits\DDLAudit_D50CF1AD-2927-44C7-AFD0-0C31D302CA35_0_129861627977120000.sqlaudit',
    5632)

Use-audit-offset

If we only wanted to see object creation records, and we wanted to know the owner of the database where the event took place, we could use the following:

select p.name, a.database_name, a.schema_name, a.object_name, a.statement
from fn_get_audit_file
   ('D:\SQL2012\Audits\DDLAudit*.sqlaudit',
    'D:\SQL2012\Audits\DDLAudit_D50CF1AD-2927-44C7-AFD0-0C31D302CA35_0_129861627977120000.sqlaudit',
    5632) a
join sys.databases d on a.database_name = d.name
join sys.server_principals p on p.sid = d.owner_sid
where action_id = 'CR'

What’s Next?

Now that we’ve covered the basics of creating an audit and reading its output, we can put this knowledge to use creating a solid auditing solution for our SQL Server instance. That’s what we’ll do next in SQL Server Audit 201 – Creating an Audit Solution.

SQL Server Audit Series

This blog series was designed to help you audit database changes.  Contact us if you have any questions about how to select and implement the right auditing solution for your organization with SQL Server Audit.
  1. SQL Server Auditing – Getting Started
  2. SQL Server Audit 101 – Creating Basic Audit
  3. SQL Server Audit 102 – Reading Audit Output 
  4. SQL Server Audit 201 – Creating Audit Solution
  5. SQL Server Audit 301 – Using PowerShell to Manage Audits
  6. SQL Server Audit 302 – Deploying Audit Solution with PowerShell
UpSearch

About the Author

SQL Server Consultant

Colleen Morrow

UpSearch Alum Colleen Morrow is a database strategist, community advocate, author, blogger and public speaker. She is passionate about helping technology leaders use Microsoft's SQL Server to protect, optimize and unlock data's value.

Colleen has been working with relational databases for almost 20 years. Since 2000, Colleen has specialized in SQL Server and Oracle database management solutions. She excels at performance tuning, troubleshooting mission critical SQL Server environments, and training technology professionals and business users of all levels.

Since 2011, Colleen has maintained a SQL Server focused blog at http://colleenmorrow.com. She is an active member of the Ohio North SQL Server User Group, as well as a volunteer for the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS). Colleen earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Systems from Cleveland State University.

Learn more about Colleen Morrow at https://upsearch.com/colleen-morrow/.

SQL Server Health Check Series

This blog series will help you decide if UpSearch’s <span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/microsoft-sql-server-health-check/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check</a></span> is right for your organization. Follow the links below to learn how you can use our assessment to identify and resolve SQL Server problems.


<ol>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-introduction/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Introduction</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-benefits/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Benefits</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-1-collect-metrics/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 1</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-2-analyze-results/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 2</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-3-report-findings/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 3</a></span></li>

</ol>

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

Auditing doesn’t have to be scary. SQL Server Audit 101 – Creating Basic Audit is part of a blog series designed to help you audit changes to your database by using SQL Server Audit.  Contact us if you have any questions about how to select and implement the right auditing solution for your organization.  

SQL Server Audit 101 – Creating Basic Audit

SQL Server Audit 101 – Creating Basic AuditOriginally published on ColleenMorrow.com.

SQL Audit was introduced in SQL 2008, and for the first time auditing was treated as a “first-class” object in SQL Server, meaning it could be managed by DDL statements. It was built on the extended events framework and what made it really neat was that the event was recorded when the permission-check for that event occurred. What this meant to us as auditors was that the event would be recorded even if it didn’t really happen because the user didn’t have permissions. Why is this good? Well, suppose you’re auditing the execution of a stored procedure that modifies some sensitive data, like salary information. Wouldn’t it be nice to know not only who is executing that stored procedure, but who is trying to execute it?

One good thing about SQL Audit is that it executes asynchronously, which means it’s not going to hold up user processes. Unfortunately, that means it also can’t access certain information, like the network login or client associated with a session. So, going back to the salary procedure example, if a user is using a generic login to execute that procedure, you might have a hard time tracing it back to a real person.

Create the Server Audit

The first step in creating a SQL Audit is to create the audit object.

CreateServerAudit1_thumb

If you’re familiar with creating an audit in SQL Server 2008, you’ll notice a few changes in SQL 2012. The first is the “On Audit Log Failure” selection. In SQL 2008, this was only be checkbox to shutdown server on audit log failure. In SQL 2012, we now have options to continue (the equivalent of not checking the old checkbox), shutdown (checking the old checkbox) or fail operation, which will fail any operation that should have been recorded but couldn’t. This is nice if you want to prevent audited activity from going unrecorded, but don’t want to impact everything.

We have the same options for output: a file, the Windows Application log, or the Windows Security log. Keep in mind that, if you want to write to the Security log, some configuration is required.

The next change we see is the option for maximum files or maximum rollover files. Maximum rollover files means that, when that number of files is reached, the oldest file will be overwritten. If you choose Maximum files, however, once that max is reached, subsequent writes fail.

But the change that got me most excited (at first) was the new Filter tab. My biggest beef with SQL Audit in SQL 2008 was the inability to filter out any unwanted activity or objects from the audit output. It made for a lot of clutter. But in SQL 2012, we now have the ability to enter a predicate to filter the audit on, i.e. “(database_name = ‘AdventureWorks2012′)” This string is limited to 3000 characters.

CreateServerAudit2_thumb

Create the Audit Specification

The audit object tells SQL Server where to write the audit records, and how to manage them, but doesn’t actually specify what events to audit. For that, we need to create an audit specification.

There are 2 types of audit specification: a server audit specification or a database audit specification. Generally speaking, a server audit specification is used to audit events that occur at the server level; things like database creations, logins, creating a linked server. A database audit specification will audit events that occur at the database level; things like executing a stored procedure, creating a user, dropping a table. There are, however, some audit groups and events that span both levels. You can, for example, audit the SCHEMA_OBJECT_CHANGE_GROUP at the server or the database level. If you do it at the database level, it will only audit DDL changes in that database. Auditing it at the server level, however, will track DDL changes in all databases. You can create Server level audit specifications in all editions of SQL Server, however database audit specifications are only supported in Enterprise, Developer, and Evaluation editions.

Let’s say I want to audit DDL changes in the AdventureWorks2012 database. I can create a database audit specification or I can create a server audit specification and use the new filtering functionality to limit my audit output to only AdventureWorks2012 changes. Let’s do that. What’s the advantage? In this case, not much. But let’s say you have 100 databases on this server, and you want to audit all but 5. You could create database audit specs in 95 databases, or you could create one server audit spec and filter out the 5 databases you don’t want. Up to you.

CreateServerAuditSpec_thumb

Activating the Audit

Once I’ve created the audit and the audit specification, I’m almost ready to go. Before SQL Server will audit anything, I need to enable both the audit and the audit specification. I can do this by right-clicking on each and selecting “Enable” or I can do it using an ALTER statement.

Test the Audit and the Filter

I have my AdventureWorks2012 database. That’s what I’m auditing. But I also have a NoAuditDB which I’m, obviously, not auditing. If I create a table in each database and check the Audit logs (which I do by right-clicking on the Audit and selecting “View Audit Logs”) I see only one entry, the one for AdventureWorks2012.

TestAuditandFiltering_thumb

About that Filter…

That filtering feature seems pretty handy, but what if you have a number of databases/objects/logins/etc. that you want to include or exclude from your audit? Listing each one can become cumbersome to say the least. What if you had a table somewhere that contained all the objects to exclude from your audit, could you use a subquery in the Filter predicate? Unfortunately, no, SQL Audit doesn’t handle this. Bummer.

That’s ok, though. As we’ll see soon, there’s more than one way to skin a cat. In fact, there’s even more than one cat. SQL Server Audit 102 – Reading Audit Output is next.

SQL Server Audit Series

This blog series was designed to help you audit database changes.  Contact us if you have any questions about how to select and implement the right auditing solution for your organization with SQL Server Audit.
  1. SQL Server Auditing – Getting Started
  2. SQL Server Audit 101 – Creating Basic Audit
  3. SQL Server Audit 102 – Reading Audit Output 
  4. SQL Server Audit 201 – Creating Audit Solution
  5. SQL Server Audit 301 – Using PowerShell to Manage Audits
  6. SQL Server Audit 302 – Deploying Audit Solution with PowerShell
UpSearch

About the Author

SQL Server Consultant

Colleen Morrow

UpSearch Alum Colleen Morrow is a database strategist, community advocate, author, blogger and public speaker. She is passionate about helping technology leaders use Microsoft's SQL Server to protect, optimize and unlock data's value.

Colleen has been working with relational databases for almost 20 years. Since 2000, Colleen has specialized in SQL Server and Oracle database management solutions. She excels at performance tuning, troubleshooting mission critical SQL Server environments, and training technology professionals and business users of all levels.

Since 2011, Colleen has maintained a SQL Server focused blog at http://colleenmorrow.com. She is an active member of the Ohio North SQL Server User Group, as well as a volunteer for the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS). Colleen earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Systems from Cleveland State University.

Learn more about Colleen Morrow at https://upsearch.com/colleen-morrow/.

SQL Server Health Check Series

This blog series will help you decide if UpSearch’s <span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/microsoft-sql-server-health-check/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check</a></span> is right for your organization. Follow the links below to learn how you can use our assessment to identify and resolve SQL Server problems.


<ol>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-introduction/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Introduction</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-benefits/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Benefits</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-1-collect-metrics/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 1</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-2-analyze-results/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 2</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-3-report-findings/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 3</a></span></li>

</ol>

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

Inside the Black Box – Making Sense of SQL Server Service Broker

 

About the Presentation


SQL Server Service Broker is often seen as a black box. Messages go in, and hopefully they come out on the other side. But when they don’t, DBAs typically don’t know where to look. Trying to figure out what’s wrong quickly turns into a guessing game.

Inside the Black Box - Making Sense of SQL Server Service BrokerIt’s not that complicated once you understand how it all works.

Service Broker is an asynchronous messaging technology built into SQL Server that allows you to scale out your application, replicate data or perform ETL, all while guaranteeing messages are delivered and processed in the right order. In this session, we’ll discuss the basics of the Service Broker architecture, its components, and deployment options. We will discuss troubleshooting tips and performance best practices to help you deploy a SQL Service Broker solution in your own environment.

Session Level: Beginner

Download the Presentation

Inside the Black Box - Making Sense of SQL Server Service Broker
[iframe id=’powf_21637DEC8B4EE61180E9C4346BDC4261′ src=’https://pocloudcentral.crm.powerobjects.net/powerwebform/powerwebform.aspx?t=vGKc9HDSM0KIvgkegLCU53UAcABzAGUAYQByAGMAaAA%3D&formId=powf_21637DEC8B4EE61180E9C4346BDC4261&tver=2013′ frameborder=’0′ width=’100%’ height=’360′]

Presentations (Upcoming & Past)

 

Want to Learn More About SQL Server Service Broker?

If you'd like to learn more about how UpSearch can support your SQL Server service broker initiative, visit SQL Server Service Broker or contact us today.

About the Author

SQL Server Consultant

Colleen Morrow

UpSearch Alum Colleen Morrow is a database strategist, community advocate, author, blogger and public speaker. She is passionate about helping technology leaders use Microsoft's SQL Server to protect, optimize and unlock data's value.

Colleen has been working with relational databases for almost 20 years. Since 2000, Colleen has specialized in SQL Server and Oracle database management solutions. She excels at performance tuning, troubleshooting mission critical SQL Server environments, and training technology professionals and business users of all levels.

Since 2011, Colleen has maintained a SQL Server focused blog at http://colleenmorrow.com. She is an active member of the Ohio North SQL Server User Group, as well as a volunteer for the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS). Colleen earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Systems from Cleveland State University.

Learn more about Colleen Morrow at https://upsearch.com/colleen-morrow/.

SQL Server Health Check Series

This blog series will help you decide if UpSearch’s <span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/microsoft-sql-server-health-check/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check</a></span> is right for your organization. Follow the links below to learn how you can use our assessment to identify and resolve SQL Server problems.


<ol>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-introduction/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Introduction</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-benefits/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Benefits</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-1-collect-metrics/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 1</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-2-analyze-results/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 2</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-3-report-findings/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 3</a></span></li>

</ol>

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

SQL Server Auditing – Getting Started

Auditing doesn’t have to be scary. SQL Server Auditing – Getting Started is part of a blog series designed to help you audit changes to your database by using SQL Server Audit.  Contact us if you have any questions about how to select and implement the right auditing solution for your organization.  

SQL Server Auditing – Getting Started

SQL Server Auditing – Getting StartedOriginally published on ColleenMorrow.com.

In my last organization, one of my jobs was auditing our database environment. I had been tasked with this responsibility for several years, and it wasn’t always easy. In fact, I used to despise the entire process. Why? Because I wasn’t using the right tool for the job. I didn’t know what options were available to me. Granted, I started out in SQL Server 2000, where there weren’t a whole lot of choices to begin with.

Over the years, I’ve taken a particular interest in auditing options available in SQL Server, mainly with the goal of making that part of my job easier. True, I probably could have gone to my boss at any point and said “hey, we should get a third-party auditing tool.” But the fact is, I get a kick out of seeing just what I can do with each tool. How I can spy on watch over my users and developers. Making the most of the tools I have at my disposal already. And these days, our audits are a piece of cake.

Why Audit?

There are a number of reasons why you might need to implement auditing in SQL Server. Maybe your company is bringing in an outside firm to perform security audits. Or you might even be required by law to perform such auditing. From a development perspective, auditing DDL changes can supplement a change management system. Or it can help you answer the question, “what changed?” that will inevitably be directed at you when the poop hits the fan. Auditing can tell you who’s accessing that sensitive data, or help you figure out what a particular login is being used for.

What Can You Audit?

So what exactly can you audit in SQL Server? Just about anything. For example:

  • DDL changes: create, alter, drop, truncate
  • Logins: all logins, failed logins, logins by sysadmins
  • When Agent jobs are created, removed, or changed
  • Who is accessing sensitive data or procedures
  • Who is trying to access sensitive data or procedures
  • Changes to a user’s or login’s privileges
  • Server or database configuration changes
  • The use of deprecated features

The thing is, almost everything that happens in SQL Server generates an event. A user logging in generates an event, as does that user issuing a query. Any locks that occur while that query executes generate events. Any waits, any disk space allocations, any object creations: they all generate events. And if it generates an event, chances are good that you can audit it in some way.

What Are Your Requirements?

Ok, so you’ve decided to audit your SQL Server database. Or maybe you’ve been told to. Either way, the first thing you need to do is figure out your requirements. Taking time to plan out exactly what you need will save yourself tons of time and frustration later. Trust me.

What Do You Want to Audit? The most important thing you need to decide is exactly what events you want to audit. Is this a DDL audit? Is it a security audit? Some auditing tools are better suited to handle tracking specific events, so depending on what you need to record, this could rule out a solution completely.

What Data Do You Want to Collect? If you’re auditing logins, you’ll obviously want to know the login name, and most likely the date and time of the login. But do you also need to know the application? What about the network login of the user or the client’s hostname? If you’re auditing DDL changes, it would definitely be useful to capture the SQL statement issued.

Where Do You Want to Run This Audit? Are you only planning on auditing a single database on a single instance, or is this going to be a system-wide thing? If you’re planning on auditing many environments, you’ll want something that’s easy to implement and maintain; maybe something you can manage centrally. The SQL version and edition of the audit target also matter.

Where Do You Want the Output to Go? Should the output be written to a file or would you prefer a database table? If you’re auditing several databases/instances, should they all write to separate outputs or a single repository? Should DDL audit output commingle with security audit output? Who should have access to the output? And how long do you want to retain it?

How Will the Audit Output Be Processed? Will you be reporting on the output? Will you need to search the output for specific events? Will you need to compare or search output from various audits?

What’s Your Budget? SQL Server has several free built-in tools that you can use to audit your database, but there are also a number of third-party tools available. Of course, these products come at a price, and that price generally goes up in proportion to the number of systems you want to audit.

Additional Considerations

Once you’re gotten your requirements firmed up, you can start using them to select an audit tool. In SQL Server, you have several options at your disposal, with each offering its own set of pros and cons. When picking out a solution, obviously you want to ensure it meets those requirements, but there are a few more things you’ll want to consider.

Will it Impact Normal Processing? Ideally you want a solution that will have minimal or no impact on the day-to-day performance of your SQL environment.

How Tamper-proof Is It? This is especially important when it comes to security-related auditing. You want to know that someone can’t mess with your audit to avoid having certain events recorded.

How Easy Is It to Implement/Maintain? The easier your audit process is to implement and use, the less painful auditing will be. Generally speaking, if you dread the whole audit process, you’re probably not using the right tool.

How Granular Is It? Can You Filter Out Certain Events or Objects? This is something that’s especially important to me. I do DDL auditing on a database where certain objects are routinely dropped and recreated by the application. I don’t care about those objects and I don’t want them in the audit report. I also don’t want things like index maintenance showing up. So the ability to exclude objects or events is something I look for.

Coming Up

Now that you know what you need, it’s time to start test driving some solutions. In the days (ok maybe weeks) to come, I’ll be discussing several of your options for auditing events in SQL Server. I’ll talk about how they work, what their pros and cons are, and hopefully introduce you to some new ideas for implementing and using them. Auditing is necessary, but it doesn’t have to be boring. Good stuff ahead, people. Check out SQL Server Audit 101 – Creating Basic Audit next.

SQL Server Audit Series

This blog series was designed to help you audit database changes.  Contact us if you have any questions about how to select and implement the right auditing solution for your organization with SQL Server Audit.
  1. SQL Server Auditing – Getting Started
  2. SQL Server Audit 101 – Creating Basic Audit
  3. SQL Server Audit 102 – Reading Audit Output 
  4. SQL Server Audit 201 – Creating Audit Solution
  5. SQL Server Audit 301 – Using PowerShell to Manage Audits
  6. SQL Server Audit 302 – Deploying Audit Solution with PowerShell
UpSearch

About the Author

SQL Server Consultant

Colleen Morrow

UpSearch Alum Colleen Morrow is a database strategist, community advocate, author, blogger and public speaker. She is passionate about helping technology leaders use Microsoft's SQL Server to protect, optimize and unlock data's value.

Colleen has been working with relational databases for almost 20 years. Since 2000, Colleen has specialized in SQL Server and Oracle database management solutions. She excels at performance tuning, troubleshooting mission critical SQL Server environments, and training technology professionals and business users of all levels.

Since 2011, Colleen has maintained a SQL Server focused blog at http://colleenmorrow.com. She is an active member of the Ohio North SQL Server User Group, as well as a volunteer for the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS). Colleen earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Systems from Cleveland State University.

Learn more about Colleen Morrow at https://upsearch.com/colleen-morrow/.

SQL Server Health Check Series

This blog series will help you decide if UpSearch’s <span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/microsoft-sql-server-health-check/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check</a></span> is right for your organization. Follow the links below to learn how you can use our assessment to identify and resolve SQL Server problems.


<ol>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-introduction/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Introduction</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-benefits/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Benefits</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-1-collect-metrics/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 1</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-2-analyze-results/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 2</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-3-report-findings/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 3</a></span></li>

</ol>

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

Colleen Morrow Promoted to Principal Consultant

We are pleased to announce Colleen Morrow has been promoted to Principal Consultant.  Congratulations Colleen!

 

About Colleen Morrow

colleen_large

Colleen joined UpSearch in October 2014 as a SQL Server Consultant. She quickly proved to be a natural at consulting services. Colleen’s sharp intuition and keen sense of urgency was immediately noticed by clients and team members alike. One year later, clients continue to rave about her combination of technical know-how, productivity and professionalism.

In this new position, Colleen will be responsible for the delivery of UpSearch’s Microsoft Practice professional and managed services. She will work directly with me to evolve the Practice’s delivery maturity. Learn more about Colleen Morrow here.

Please help me wish Colleen continued success.

Shawn Upchurch,
Founder & CEO

Congratulations Colleen!

Fun Fact

Colleen presented Enterprise Auditing with SQL Server Audit at PASS Summit 2015.

 

SQL Server Health Check Series

This blog series will help you decide if UpSearch’s <span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/microsoft-sql-server-health-check/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check</a></span> is right for your organization. Follow the links below to learn how you can use our assessment to identify and resolve SQL Server problems.


<ol>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-introduction/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Introduction</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-benefits/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Benefits</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-1-collect-metrics/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 1</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-2-analyze-results/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 2</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-3-report-findings/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 3</a></span></li>

</ol>

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

Enterprise Audit with SQL Server Audit

 

About the Presentation


Enterprise Audit with SQL Server AuditAudit. The very word strikes fear in the bravest of hearts. But as a DBA, the need to know who is doing what in your production databases is critical. In SQL Server 2008, Microsoft finally gave us a true auditing tool. But how does it work, what exactly can it track, and how can you handle its output?

In Enterprise Audit with SQL Server Audit, we cover SQL Server Audit from the ground up. We go from the basics of which events can be audited to a look at how SQL Server Audit works “under the covers”, and what that means for performance. While implementing server and database audits, we discuss audit granularity and filtering, as well as the pros and cons of Audit’s output options.

Whether it’s through the SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) interface, via T-SQL, or using PowerShell and Server Management Objects (SMO), at the end of this session you’ll be able to deploy Audit across your SQL Server enterprise and manage its output, fearlessly.

Session Level: Intermediate

 This session was presented at PASS Summit 2015.Enterprise Audit with SQL Server Audit

Download the Presentation

Enterprise Audit with SQL Server Audit
[iframe id=’powf_A66358501566E61180E95065F38A4B21′ src=’https://pocloudcentral.crm.powerobjects.net/powerwebform/powerwebform.aspx?t=vGKc9HDSM0KIvgkegLCU53UAcABzAGUAYQByAGMAaAA%3D&formId=powf_A66358501566E61180E95065F38A4B21&tver=2013′ frameborder=’0′ width=’100%’ height=’360′]

Presentations (Upcoming & Past)

Want to Learn More About SQL Server Audit?

If you'd like to learn more about how UpSearch can support your SQL Server audit initiative, visit SQL Server Audit or contact us today.

About the Author

SQL Server Consultant

Colleen Morrow

UpSearch Alum Colleen Morrow is a database strategist, community advocate, author, blogger and public speaker. She is passionate about helping technology leaders use Microsoft's SQL Server to protect, optimize and unlock data's value.

Colleen has been working with relational databases for almost 20 years. Since 2000, Colleen has specialized in SQL Server and Oracle database management solutions. She excels at performance tuning, troubleshooting mission critical SQL Server environments, and training technology professionals and business users of all levels.

Since 2011, Colleen has maintained a SQL Server focused blog at http://colleenmorrow.com. She is an active member of the Ohio North SQL Server User Group, as well as a volunteer for the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS). Colleen earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Systems from Cleveland State University.

Learn more about Colleen Morrow at https://upsearch.com/colleen-morrow/.

SQL Server Health Check Series

This blog series will help you decide if UpSearch’s <span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/microsoft-sql-server-health-check/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check</a></span> is right for your organization. Follow the links below to learn how you can use our assessment to identify and resolve SQL Server problems.


<ol>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-introduction/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Introduction</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-benefits/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Benefits</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-1-collect-metrics/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 1</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-2-analyze-results/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 2</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-3-report-findings/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 3</a></span></li>

</ol>

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

What Changed? SQL Server 2014 Auditing Options

 

About the Presentation

What Changed? SQL Server 2014 Auditing OptionsWhen and how was this view changed? Where did that index go? Who’s accessing my sensitive data? As a DBA, you’ll face these and similar questions throughout your career. And if you don’t have an audit in place, providing answers can be difficult.

In this demo-rich session we’ll examine SQL Server 2014 auditing options, including SQL Trace, event notifications, DDL and logon triggers, and SQL Server Audit. We’ll begin by defining real-world requirements for an auditing solution, such as events to capture, data to collect, output destinations, and performance considerations. As we implement each tool, we’ll discuss its unique benefits and limitations, and see how it stacks up against our specifications.

By the end of this session, you’ll have the knowledge you need to select and implement the auditing tool that’s right for you.

Session Level: Intermediate

Download the Presentation

What Changed? SQL Server 2014 Auditing Options
[iframe id=’powf_96659D7F994EE61180E9C4346BDC4261′ src=’https://pocloudcentral.crm.powerobjects.net/powerwebform/powerwebform.aspx?t=vGKc9HDSM0KIvgkegLCU53UAcABzAGUAYQByAGMAaAA%3D&formId=powf_96659D7F994EE61180E9C4346BDC4261&tver=2013′ frameborder=’0′ width=’100%’ height=’360′]

Presentations (Upcoming & Past)

Want to Learn More About SQL Server Audit?

If you'd like to learn more about how UpSearch can support your SQL Server audit initiative, visit SQL Server Audit or contact us today.

About the Author

SQL Server Consultant

Colleen Morrow

UpSearch Alum Colleen Morrow is a database strategist, community advocate, author, blogger and public speaker. She is passionate about helping technology leaders use Microsoft's SQL Server to protect, optimize and unlock data's value.

Colleen has been working with relational databases for almost 20 years. Since 2000, Colleen has specialized in SQL Server and Oracle database management solutions. She excels at performance tuning, troubleshooting mission critical SQL Server environments, and training technology professionals and business users of all levels.

Since 2011, Colleen has maintained a SQL Server focused blog at http://colleenmorrow.com. She is an active member of the Ohio North SQL Server User Group, as well as a volunteer for the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS). Colleen earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Systems from Cleveland State University.

Learn more about Colleen Morrow at https://upsearch.com/colleen-morrow/.

SQL Server Health Check Series

This blog series will help you decide if UpSearch’s <span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/microsoft-sql-server-health-check/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check</a></span> is right for your organization. Follow the links below to learn how you can use our assessment to identify and resolve SQL Server problems.


<ol>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-introduction/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Introduction</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-benefits/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Benefits</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-1-collect-metrics/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 1</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-2-analyze-results/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 2</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-3-report-findings/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 3</a></span></li>

</ol>

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

So you want to be a Database Administrator

 

About the Presentation

In 2014, CareerBliss.com and Forbes Magazine ranked Database Administrator as the #1 happiest job. But what exactly does a DBA do? How does someone become a DBA? And why are they so darned happy? In this session we’ll explore the different types of DBA, their roles and responsibilities, and the career path for database professionals. Whether you’re just starting your career and trying to find your footing, or you’re a seasoned veteran wondering where to go from here, this session will show you the possibilities.

Session Level: Intermediate

Download the Presentation

So you want to be a Database Administrator (DBA)
[iframe id=’powf_8236E3D8734FE61180EBC4346BDC4261′ src=’https://pocloudcentral.crm.powerobjects.net/powerwebform/powerwebform.aspx?t=vGKc9HDSM0KIvgkegLCU53UAcABzAGUAYQByAGMAaAA%3D&formId=powf_8236E3D8734FE61180EBC4346BDC4261&tver=2013′ frameborder=’0′ width=’100%’ height=’360′]

Presentations (Upcoming & Past)

 

About the Author

SQL Server Consultant

Colleen Morrow

UpSearch Alum Colleen Morrow is a database strategist, community advocate, author, blogger and public speaker. She is passionate about helping technology leaders use Microsoft's SQL Server to protect, optimize and unlock data's value.

Colleen has been working with relational databases for almost 20 years. Since 2000, Colleen has specialized in SQL Server and Oracle database management solutions. She excels at performance tuning, troubleshooting mission critical SQL Server environments, and training technology professionals and business users of all levels.

Since 2011, Colleen has maintained a SQL Server focused blog at http://colleenmorrow.com. She is an active member of the Ohio North SQL Server User Group, as well as a volunteer for the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS). Colleen earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Systems from Cleveland State University.

Learn more about Colleen Morrow at https://upsearch.com/colleen-morrow/.

SQL Server Health Check Series

This blog series will help you decide if UpSearch’s <span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/microsoft-sql-server-health-check/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check</a></span> is right for your organization. Follow the links below to learn how you can use our assessment to identify and resolve SQL Server problems.


<ol>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-introduction/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Introduction</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-benefits/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Benefits</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-1-collect-metrics/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 1</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-2-analyze-results/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 2</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-3-report-findings/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 3</a></span></li>

</ol>

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.

Implementing a data warehouse: SSIS Connection Managers

Originally published on ColleenMorrow.com.

This post is part of a series on implementing a data warehouse with Microsoft SQL Server 2012. So far, we’ve covered:

One of the first items you’ll create when developing a new project in SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) is a connection manager.  Connection managers allow control flow and data flow tasks within SSIS packages to access a variety of data sources and destinations.  Depending on the type of connection manager you create, you’ll be able to access relational database sources like SQL Server or Oracle, web services, external files, FTP Servers.  The connection manager you select will not only determine what data store you can access, but it can also determine what functionality is available to you, so choose wisely.

The following connection managers are built-in:

  • SQL Server
    • ADO.NET (preferred when using stored procedures or parameterized queries for its usability and better support for a larger range of data types)
    • ODBC
    • OLE DB (deprecated, use ODBC instead)
    • SQL Server Compact Edition
  • SQL Server administrative tasks
    • SMO
  • File operations
    • File or Multiple File
    • Flat File or Multiple Flat File
    • FTP
  • Other
    • Analysis Services
    • DQS (Data Quality Services)
    • Excel
    • HTTP
    • MSMQ (Microsoft Message Queueing)
    • SMTP
    • WMI (Windows Management Instrumentation)

Once you’ve created a connection manager, you can reuse it as often as needed within the package/project, in a variety of roles.  For example, an ODBC connection to the AdventureWorks2012 database can be used as the source for a data flow task, a data flow destination, the connection for an Execute SQL Task, etc.  It’s not necessary to create a separate connection manager for each task.

32-bit or 64-bit

One of the most confusing aspects about developing SSIS projects for newbies is when you’re running 32-bit and when you’re running in 64-bit.  The SSDT development environment uses 32-bit providers.  So you’ll only see those providers where a 32-bit version of the adapter was installed on the workstation on which you’re developing.  When you execute the project outside of the development environment, the version of the adapter is determined by the OS you’re running on.  As you start to develop projects in SSDT, you may notice a project property called Run64BitRuntime.  Don’t be confused, this property is only used at design-time, not at runtime.

Scope

Within SSIS, there is a hierarchy of scope.  For example, a project can contain one or more packages.  Those packages can contain one or more connection managers.  Additionally, the project itself can contain one or more connection managers.  Where a connection manager is available is dependent on where it was created.  A package-scoped connection manager is created within the scope of a specific package and may only be accessed by tasks within that package.  Connection managers that are project-scoped, however, are available to tasks in any package within the project.  If you define both a project-scoped and a package-scoped connection manager with the same name, the package-scoped connection manager’s settings will take precedence within that package.

Summary

Connection managers are relatively simple, yet critical components in SSIS development. Familiarize yourself with the various types available and the pros and cons of each.  And bear in mind that third-party connection managers are also available.

About the Author

SQL Server Consultant

Colleen Morrow

Colleen Morrow is SQL Server Consultant at UpSearch.

Colleen is a database strategist, community advocate, author, blogger and public speaker. She is passionate about helping technology leaders use Microsoft’s SQL Server to protect, optimize and unlock data’s value.

Colleen has been working with relational databases for almost 20 years. Since 2000, Colleen has specialized in SQL Server and Oracle database management solutions. She excels at performance tuning, troubleshooting mission critical SQL Server environments, and training technology professionals and business users of all levels.

Since 2011, Colleen has maintained a SQL Server focused blog at http://colleenmorrow.com. She is an active member of the Ohio North SQL Server User Group, as well as a volunteer for the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS). Colleen earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Systems from Cleveland State University.

Learn more about Colleen Morrow at //colleen-morrow/.

Enterprise-level SQL Server Audit on a Standard Edition Budget

 

About the Presentation

Enterprise-level SQL Server Audit on a Standard Edition BudgetIn SQL Server 2008, Microsoft finally introduced a first-class auditing tool for monitoring what’s going on in your databases. Unfortunately, that’s a SQL Server Enterprise Edition feature. What about Enterprise-level SQL Server Audit on a SQL Server Standard Edition Budget? In this demo-heavy session, we’ll learn about auditing methods for the masses, including triggers, event notifications, SQL Trace, extended events, and yes, even SQL Server Audit.

Session Level: Intermediate

Download the Presentation

Enterprise-level SQL Server Audit on a Standard Edition Budget
[iframe id=’powf_C71E79A0774FE61180EBC4346BDC4261′ src=’https://pocloudcentral.crm.powerobjects.net/powerwebform/powerwebform.aspx?t=vGKc9HDSM0KIvgkegLCU53UAcABzAGUAYQByAGMAaAA%3D&formId=powf_C71E79A0774FE61180EBC4346BDC4261&tver=2013′ frameborder=’0′ width=’100%’ height=’360′]

Presentations (Upcoming & Past)

Want to Learn More About SQL Server Audit?

If you'd like to learn more about how UpSearch can support your SQL Server audit initiative, visit SQL Server Audit or contact us today.

About the Author

SQL Server Consultant

Colleen Morrow

UpSearch Alum Colleen Morrow is a database strategist, community advocate, author, blogger and public speaker. She is passionate about helping technology leaders use Microsoft's SQL Server to protect, optimize and unlock data's value.

Colleen has been working with relational databases for almost 20 years. Since 2000, Colleen has specialized in SQL Server and Oracle database management solutions. She excels at performance tuning, troubleshooting mission critical SQL Server environments, and training technology professionals and business users of all levels.

Since 2011, Colleen has maintained a SQL Server focused blog at http://colleenmorrow.com. She is an active member of the Ohio North SQL Server User Group, as well as a volunteer for the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS). Colleen earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Systems from Cleveland State University.

Learn more about Colleen Morrow at https://upsearch.com/colleen-morrow/.

SQL Server Health Check Series

This blog series will help you decide if UpSearch’s <span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/microsoft-sql-server-health-check/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check</a></span> is right for your organization. Follow the links below to learn how you can use our assessment to identify and resolve SQL Server problems.


<ol>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-introduction/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Introduction</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-benefits/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Benefits</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-1-collect-metrics/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 1</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-2-analyze-results/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 2</a></span></li>
<li><span style=”color: #0000ff;”><a style=”color: #0000ff;” href=”https://upsearch.com/sql-server-health-check-step-3-report-findings/” target=”_blank”>SQL Server Health Check Process – Step 3</a></span></li>

</ol>

About UpSearch

up-social-round

UpSearch is a company of data management and analytics experts who enable digital maturity with Microsoft’s technologies. Its mission is to enable every leader to unlock data’s full potential. UpSearch provides full lifecycle support for SQL Server, SQL Server in Azure (IaaS), Azure SQL DB (PaaS), Azure SQL DW (PaaS), Analytics Platform System (APS), and Power BI.